DCFoodies.com Gnocchi - DCFoodies.com

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Sep 16, 2008

Comments

Jason

Even though I know it's wrong I find myself calling it 'no-chee'.

jenny

i've been on a quest for the best gnocchi in the world for several years now. so far the winner is a small italian restaurant on mykonos.

i'll have to try this recipe.

Aimee

This makes me miss my Italian grandmom whom I used to sit and watch make 'ngaw-kee'(and everything else that was worth eating). She made it just like this with the dough on the table and a well in the center for the eggs and the tines of the fork for design. Ah, what I wouldn't do for one more cooking lesson from her..

fred

I love gnocchi anyway you want to pronounce it, but I join Jenny in the challenge that one can rarely find great gnocchi anywhere. Anyone want to weigh in on their top gnocchi place in DC? I haven't found it yet.

Teddy

When I used to make gnocchi, I always found that BAKING the potato and throwing it through a ricer produced the best results. Less flour was needed allowing for a less dense gnocchi.

Mike Bober

Sounds like a great technique, Teddy.

What are the odds we can get you to start making gnocchi again? Man cannot live on frites alone!

Jason

fred, I have always perfered the gnocchi at Palena. I have yet to have any better in DC, but I have to admit I haven't tried everyone's.

Erin

Gnocchi is one of my most favorite foods, but I can never seem to get it right. I will have to give this recipe a try. Thanks for posting!

Danoz

My great grandmother also made gnocchi, but her recipe called for equal parts of flower to potato and then letting the ingredients "sit" for an hour to release the gluten (making for a rather dense gnocchi). She also said, "gnaw-key" and she was a firey Italian woman. Today we follow the same recipe... it seems to be an American invention that gnocchi should be "light and fluffy" but I typically find that ALL gnocchi served in the U.S. to be... mushy. We still follow the same recipe today! In may cases, I think we use MORE flour than potato!

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